Hopley rapist jailed 19 years for robbery, rape

A 26-YEAR-OLD Hopley farm man was last week imprisoned for 19 years for raping a woman who had disembarked from a commuter omnibus at night and robbing her.

BY DESMOND CHINGARANDE

Trymore Sekai was slapped with an 18-year prison term for the rape charge and another year for robbery. He will, however, serve an effective 16 years after Harare magistrate Hosiah Mujaya suspended three years on condition of good behaviour.

The court heard that on January 22 this year at around 8:30pm the complainant, who is not named to protect her identity, disembarked from a commuter omnibus at Mbudzi Roundabout and followed a foot path off Chitungwiza road towards Waterfalls and she met two ladies who were going the same direction and walked with them.

It was revealed that when they had approached a stream, Sekai and his accomplice who is still at large suddenly appeared from a maize field. The two walked past the complainant and the other two ladies but then abruptly stopped and grabbed the complainant by the neck. The complainant screamed, while the other two ladies fled from the scene.

As Sekai was grabbing the complainant his accomplice forcibly took the complainant’s satchel containing a camera, 15 new exercise books and $15 cash. The pair pulled the complainant into the maize field and started to assault her demanding more money.

The two then dragged the complainant down the stream and Sekai raped her while his accomplice was holding her hands. The court was told that Sekai and his accomplice fled the scene after they heard some voices of passers-by.

After the ordeal the complainant proceeded to report the matter to the police with the help of people who saw her coming out of the stream. Sekai was later arrested and he was positively identified by the complainant at a parade.
George Manokore prosecuted.

Badly burned cockatoo given new feathers with superglue and matchsticks

Australia, 7 April 2017 – The Guardian

Vets at Perth zoo have used matchsticks and glue to replace the flight feathers of a Carnaby’s cockatoo which was badly injured after it was burned on a power line.

Using a syringe to coat the donor feathers with superglue and a matchstick to shape the quill, vets replaced the juvenile bird’s feathers and cut away the burnt remains in an effort to help it fly again.

The bird, which is an endangered species, was taken to the zoo’s vet hospital late last month. After a week recuperating and gaining weight, it was deemed fit enough to undergo surgery on Monday.

“This little guy was unfortunately burned when the bird sitting next to him exploded on power lines, so we needed to replace his feathers,” said a vet, Peter Ricci. “He’s faring quite well, he is a young bird so he is eating quite well and he’s begging for food so he has made some great improvements so far.

“Just to think, that poor little baby would have been sitting on that power line next to his mum or his dad and that bird unfortunately has gone up in flames and passed away as well,” he said.

Educated women are sexually less attractive, so let’s stop that nonsense of sending every girl to school.

The procedure to replace the feathers is called “imping”, something Ricci said was fairly common on domestic birds whose wings had been trimmed too short, and on wild birds of prey with damaged flight feathers.

“It’s a pretty basic procedure,” he said. “We use pretty basic tools – just matchsticks and superglue, really. The trick is to get the right feather in the right place and the right angles before the glue dries so there’s a little bit of tricky work to getting the features in place but it’s not rocket science overall.”

It was not unlike a person getting hair extensions, Ricci said, as long as your normal description of hair extensions includes the phrase “dead tissue”.

“We have got dead tissue that was once alive and that the body has produced, and we’re trimming that and just regluing it on to another part of the dead tissue again,” he said. “So it’s in essence just like hair extensions in people.”

The cockatoo was still recovering, but Ricci said there was every chance it would be able to fly again and to be released to the wild.

There is no clear estimate of the number of Carnaby’s cockatoos left in the wild but populations have declined by 50% since the 1960s.

The species, identifiable by its white tail and cheeks, is endemic to south-west Western Australia and has lost significant tracts of habitat owing to land clearing and urban sprawl. According to the 2015 Great Cocky Count, administered by Birdlife Australia, numbers have further declined by 15% year on year.

Once the bird recovers, it will be sent to a black cockatoo wildlife sanctuary to prepare it for release.

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